“I’m upset that you changed the password to the PSN account I stole from you”

Seriously crazy stuff going on with PSN account resellers in this article from Patrick Klepek:

A few weeks ago, Mic Fok got a weird email. The person writing it claimed they’d been playing Overwatch on a PlayStation Network account for more than six months, but the password had changed recently. But why would Fok know anything about this random dude’s account? As it turns out, they’d “purchased” Fok’s account through a website called PSN Games, one of many businesses trafficking in the selling of cheap games by sketchy means.

The individual who bought Fok’s account was an Overwatch fan named Bennett Eglinton.

“Hello I purchased overwatch from psngames.org and this email was used as the account info,” reads an email from Eglinton, sent in early March. “However the password I was given for the PlayStation Network sign in no longer works. Did you happen to change it? Can I get the new info.”

As Patrick mentions in the article, this is a great reason to use unique passwords everywhere with a password manager. I use and recommend 1Password despite them switching from standalone purchases to a subscription. You should also use the free Have I been pwned? service to check all of your email addresses for public account credential leaks.

Update Your iPhones and iPads Now

IMG 0083New exploits were found in the wild, being used to target human rights activists, that could take over your phone with one click on a link in a text message or through another vector.

Unlike Google’s Android, Apple was able to roll out a fix for this issue very quickly to affected devices running iOS 9 once it was discovered. iOS 9.3.5 is now available. Launch the Settings app and go to General -> Software Update -> Tap on Download and Install and install the update if you have not done so already.

The exploit was able to completely hijack a target device according to security researchers at Lookout who were interviewed by Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai:

“It basically steals all the information on your phone, it intercepts every call, it intercepts every text message, it steals all the emails, the contacts, the FaceTime calls. It also basically backdoors every communications mechanism you have on the phone,” Murray explained. “It steals all the information in the Gmail app, all the Facebook messages, all the Facebook information, your Facebook contacts, everything from Skype, WhatsApp, Viber, WeChat, Telegram–you name it.”

Apple recently announced a new bug bounty program that rewards those who find issues which could lead to exploits such as this one.

Two Men Arrested for Bringing Guns to a Pokémon Tournament

Luke O’Neil:

On Saturday, cops arrested two men who may have intended to carry out a shooting spree at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, where thousands gathered over the weekend for the Pokémon World Championship.

James Austin Stumbo, 27, and Kevin Norton, 18, high-level competitors in the internationally popular card game, had traveled from Iowa to take part in the event, and were listed in the “Masters Level,” according to the Pokémon website. (Their names have apparently since been removed.) Boston police say the duo was turned away on Thursday by private security after they had been alerted to a threatening message posted by Stumbo on a Facebook group called Mayhem Pokémon Crew. The post, a picture of firearms arranged on the back of his vehicle, read, “Kevin Norton and I are ready for worlds Boston here we come!!!”

Indie Developers: Ouya Owes Us Thousands of Dollars

Emanuel Maiberg:

On Monday, gaming peripheral company Razer announced that it acquired the software and part of the team behind Ouya, which infamously raised $8.5 million through crowdfunding in 2012 to build an Android-based microconsole. It was a desperate move for the struggling small console maker–and now some indie developers who worked on Ouya games say they’re being screwed by the acquisition.

Multiple independent developers who wish to remain anonymous have told Motherboard that contracts they had originally signed with Ouya, which promised to pay them thousands of dollars, will not be honored as a result of the acquisition.

For a console that was crowdfunded on the idea that independent game developers needed a way to put their games onto a TV when Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo weren’t doing the job, they sure managed to screw up every part of the project. From the controller to paying developers what they were promised.

After the failure of the Ouya it will now be more difficult for independent developers and gamers to trust small businesses. Where did the trust go? Back into Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo who now have better places for independent developers.