Inside a Ukrainian Nuclear Missile Base

Drew Scanlon of Cloth Map, and my favorite podcast about speedy race cars, Shift+F1, has this great video from his recent tour of a decommissioned nuclear missile base in the Ukraine. In the video Scanlon actually gets to use the launch controls.

Here’s the location on Google’s mapping service:

And here is the museum’s English Wikipedia article.

The Wartime Broadcasting System

The Wartime Broadcasting Systems

Paul Reynolds, the British Broadcasting System’s former foreign and diplomatic correspondent found the BBC’s plans for continued broadcast during nuclear war or what the BBC politely described as a “nuclear exchange”:

The War Book reveals a world of meticulous BBC planning. The Wartime Broadcasting System (WTBS) – referred to in the book as “Deferred Facilities” – would have operated from 11 protected bunkers spread across the UK.

Great article. I only wish they had posted a scan of the entire book.

Tuesday Wikipedia Trough: United States Military Chocolate

Military chocolate has been a part of standard United States military ration since the original Ration D or D ration bar of 1937. Today, military chocolate is issued to troops as part of basic field rations and sundry packs. Chocolate rations served two purposes: as a morale boost, and as a high-energy, pocket-sized emergency ration. Military chocolate rations are often made in special lots to military specifications for weight, size, and endurance. A majority of chocolate issued to military personnel is produced by the Hershey Company.

When provided as a morale boost or care package, military chocolate is often no different from normal store-bought bars in taste and composition. However, they are frequently packaged or molded differently. The World War II K ration issued in temperate climates sometimes included a bar of Hershey’s commercial-formula sweet chocolate. But instead of being the typical flat thin bar, the K ration chocolate was a thick rectangular bar that was square at each end (in tropical regions, the K ration used Hershey’s Tropical Bar formula).

via United States military chocolate – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Colonel Hugh “Slip” Slater Tells Us About an OXCART and a UFO.

Colonel Hugh

The Road to Area 51 is the LA Times’ look at the actual story behind everyone’s favorite hidden UFO landing pad, Area 51.

Colonel Hugh “Slip” Slater is the OXCART driver who, now that his missions are declassified, has spoken with various reporters about them in public. You can find what looks to be his personal page here.