Apple’s Ongoing Laptop Nightmare

A MacRumors forum member, project_2501, has posted this extensive log (via Nick Heer) of his attempt to work with Apple’s support to get a refund for one of the latest MacBook Pro’s after his couldn’t play video at 4K without overheating. Of course that overheating also caused other issues, like the glue holding the glass onto the screen peeling off. It’s an eye-watering account, I really recommend reading the whole post.

One of the reasons I’ve chosen, and recommended, Apple hardware in the past has been the often incredible customer support.

When the hardware fails, rarely, they’ve stood by it and repaired it or replaced it with the latest version in case it was a design flaw.

Their latest laptops seem to be incredibly poorly designed. So many people have written about the keyboards failing due to (what should be) insignificant specks of dust permanently interrupting keys.

Casey Johnston wrote this article for The Outline last year. Headline: The New MacBook Keyboard is Ruining My Life.

Perhaps it’s true that less dirt gets under butterfly switched-keys. But therein lies the problem — when dirt does get in, it cannot get out. A piece of dust is capable of rendering a butterfly switch nonfunctional. The key won’t click, and it won’t register whatever command it’s supposed to be typing. It’s effectively dead until someone can either shake loose the debris trapped under it or blow at the upside-down keyboard Nintendo-cartridge style. Meanwhile, Apple quietly put up a page with instructions expressly to try and help people with dead butterfly switch keys.

Having worked in a computer repair center in the past five years, I’m not likely to recommend Windows laptops, they’re cheap (or sometimes expensive) shit.

My current laptop is a late-2013 MacBook Pro that was Apple Support’s replacement for a 2011 model that had repeated issues with the GPU. This 2013 model has had issues, the rubber grommet around the screen has been slowly falling apart while the screen flickers at the login screen and takes forever to wake up with the machine after it’s been sleeping. This all started happening after their last repair on it, and their support surprised me by refusing to fix the issues caused by their repair. Instead offering a $700+ repair option. I’m holding onto it until it falls apart.

I hope that Apple can get their shit together. project_2501 ended up buying one of the 2015 models that Apple still sells for some odd reason, perhaps because the current models aren’t working out so well.

Nick Heer on the iPhone X

There are plenty of reviews out there now, but few had much time with the iPhone X  before it was released because Apple chose to not give reviewers an opportunity to spend much time with it.

Nick Heer:

The iPhone X is a product that feels like it shouldn’t really exist — at least, not in consumers’ hands. I know that there are millions of them in existence now, but mine feels like an incredibly well-made, one-off prototype, as I’m sure all of them do individually. It’s not just that the display feels futuristic — I’ll get to that in a bit — nor is it the speed of using it, or Face ID, or anything else that you might expect. It is all of those things, combined with how nice this product is.

Delete Uber Parts 1-3999

Nick Heer has this round-up of Uber in the news for the past 3 years. It includes this gem, from Buzzfeed:

Early this November, one of the reporters of this story, Johana Bhuiyan, arrived to Uber’s New York headquarters in Long Island City for an interview with Josh Mohrer, the general manager of Uber New York. Stepping out of her vehicle — an Uber car — she found Mohrer waiting for her. “There you are,” he said, holding his iPhone and gesturing at it. “I was tracking you.”

Mohrer never asked for permission to track her.

Tech Companies Don’t Hire Minorities or Promote Women

Nick Heer, whose Pixel Envy is one of the best sites in my feed reader these days, has completely dismantled any notion you might have that diversity is an issue that big tech companies are working on resolving. Heer has been looking at the stats for years and his annual report for 2016 is now available. It shows minimal improvements from Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Microsoft, and how the numbers don’t match those of the overall workforce in the United States.

Particularly interesting is the Gender Diversity in Leadership/Executive Positions section, which clearly shows how in tech women might be hired, but they are never promoted into leadership roles.

Getting back to ethnic diversity, one of the biggest lies I’ve heard repeated is that the issue preventing minorities from being hired is that they don’t study computer science in school. This is complete bullshit for minorities as Heer points out in his footnotes:

I will reiterate that one of the excuses most frequently cited by tech companies for their lack of diversity is a small selection of underrepresented prospective employees coming out of colleges and universities in the United States. This is false.

However, the pipeline argument has been true for women in computer science, as an episode of Planet Money from 2014 points out, in 1984 women started being  shoved out of the computer science door at every point in the process. Ads for computers were targeted towards males and the culture at schools became male-dominated and exclusionary, which then moved into the workplace.