Radio Garden

UntitledImage A lot of things about the internet are sad these days. With the internet people can find their kind of people and that is how you end up with good things like people who like mechanical keyboards developing their own keyboard projects but you also get groups of white supremacists organizing to storm the U.S. Capitol or people spreading lies about elections to lead up to that kind of action. One good thing on the internet is Radio Garden, a website that aggregates internet-accessible real-world radio stations from around the globe onto a virtual globe directory that you can click through to listen to any of them by clicking on the station’s general physical location.

Maybe the only downside is that the Radio Garden has dynamic ads inserted before the remote radio station starts playing. It was jarring when I tuned into this station depicted above in Germany only to hear a Verizon ad in English clearly targeted at U.S. customers.

The mobile version of Radio Garden has one In-App Purchase to remove ads, but it’s only for removing interstitial ad graphics and not the audio ads. Unfortunately the app says the Radio Garden developers have no control over the audio ads. So, unfortunately the internet also let ad publishers and agencies get together for enhanced advertising. Which is why Facebook is now advertising to me and interrupting this German radio station to tell me how their ad programs are safe and definitely not completely evil.

Musish is Better Than iTunes for Apple Music on Windows, Linux, and macOS

If you use Apple Music, the streaming music service from Apple that gives artists pennies instead of dollars, and want to listen on your computer, Musish is open source, runs in your web browser, and a much better alternative to running the full desktop iTunes instance if you don’t need to listen to a locally-stored collection of music.

Musish appears to log in to your Apple ID via an Apple-supplied authentication system. Very handy, I look forward to using this on Linux, where iTunes isn’t available at all.

Tim Angus’ Unique Electric Guitar

The first time I ever saw a 3D printer in-person was at a robotics conference for software developers in Florida. That thing printed out a tiny little model of an intricate water jug and I was in awe.

Imagine the look on my face when I woke up this morning and saw that ioquake3 developer Tim Angus had designed every 3D-printed part in this electric guitar.

Here’s how Tim describes the project:

When I was a teenager I made an electric guitar, because I couldn’t afford a real PRS. I fitted a Roland GK2A midi pickup to it, by taking it to bits and cramming it all into the body of the guitar, since at the time Roland didn’t make the internal version. I was never completely happy with it and for one reason or another I removed it after a few years, but after I got hold of a 3D printer, I realised I could do a much better job…

If you want to keep up with the other problems that he solves with his ingenuity and a 3D printer, check out Tim Angus’ YouTube channel and follow his official Twitter account.

Nine Inch Nails Collaborated With Llamasoft’s Jeff Minter and Twin Peaks

This is frankly insane, there’s a new video out from Nine Inch Nails and it’s got footage from Llamasoft’s Polybius.  Jeff Minter is Llamasoft and he has made many other trippy and intense action arcade games, most people would know him for Tempest 2000. Although Polybius is only available on the PlayStation 4, a Windows version is in development. The track in the collaboration video above, Less Than, will be on a new EP called Add Violence on the 21st of July. Less Than is available right now on Apple Music.

This is after Nine Inch Nails also appeared on the renewed Twin Peaks: